Schedule

Previous Schedule: 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

2021

December 2

Perspektivenkommission, Berlin-Dahlem

October 28,29

(on-line) CPTS Sektionssitzung, Berlin-Dahlem

October 20

Perspektivenkommission, München

September 24

Perspektivenkommission, Berlin-Dahlem

July 19

Perspektivenkommission, Berlin-Dahlem

July 12–16

The 16th international conference on the Dark Side of the Universe at ICTP-EAIFR, Kigali, Rwanda

June 23

CPTS Sektionssitzung, Magdeburg

June 7–11postponed to Feb 14–18, 2022 due to COVID-19

Gravity - The Next Generation”, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto

May 10

Perspektivenkommission, Berlin-Dahlem

April 29

Padova

March 31

(on-line) Perspektivenkommission

March 8–12

(on-line) PFS Collaboration Meeting

February 18,19

(on-line) CPTS Sektionssitzung

February 8–11, 15–18

(on-line) LiteBIRD Collaboration Meeting

February 6

学術変革領域「ダークマター」シンポジウム

  • 研究項目B06: 宇宙マイクロ波背景放射によるダークマター探索

February 1

MPA Institute Seminar on “Hunting for Parity-violating Physics in Polarisation of the Cosmic Microwave Background” (15:30-16:15)

January 27

(on-line) Perspektivenkommission

January 26

Give a remote talk on “Hunting for Parity-violating Physics in Polarisation of the Cosmic Microwave Background” (14:00-) for the Copernics Webinar Series

January 23

NHKカルチャー・オンライン講演「宇宙の始まり、そして終わり」(日本時間:17:00-18:30; ドイツ時間9:00-10:30)

January 15

The 237th AAS meeting, to present “Prime Focus Spectrograph: Cosmology Program

January 11

Reluctantly back to the normal life.

January 8

Remote public lecture on “Where are we from? Clues from the light of the fireball Universe” [German Time: 19:10-12:00 (35+15); UK Time: 18:10-19:00 (35+15)], for celebration on the birthday of Stephen Hawking, the University of Cambridge.

  • Abstract: The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) gives a photographic image of the Universe when it was still an “infant”. Its detailed measurements have given us a wealth of information such as the composition and history of the Universe. We are now using it to test our ideas about the origin of the Universe. The CMB research told us a remarkable story: the structure we see in our Universe such as galaxies, stars, planets, and eventually ourselves originated from tiny quantum fluctuations in the early Universe. But is this picture true? In this lecture Eiichiro Komatsu will review the physics of CMB and key results from recent experiments, while discussing future prospects for quest to find out about our origins.

December 18 (2020)–January 7

Urlaub. Kein Lapton, keine E-mail!

komatsu_at_mpa-garching_dot_mpg_dot_de © EIICHIRO KOMATSU 2012